I was surprised and delighted with the turnout out for our first ever Spring Wreath Workshop! Thanks to all 3o of you who showed up for a “spring” workshop despite the dusting of snow and slippery roads. You guys did great and the wreath designs you came up with inspired us! So for those of you who didn’t make it, here is a how-to spring wreath briefing.

It all starts with the product. This year, we have an amazing selection of spring silk flowers, including all kinds of permanent grasses, pods and succulents. All are suitable for indoor or outdoor use.

Choose your theme.

Are you working with a color story? Do you like muted tones, multi-colored flowers, a monochromatic color scheme? Walk around the store and pick items from the following categories – a green or a grass, a filler flower, a pod or seed head and a chunky element. Your chunky element could be a larger flower head like a rose or a hydrangea, a nest or an assortment of succulents. Hold all of you items in a bundle and ask yourself: “Does this make a nice bouquet?”

Choose your wreath form.

We worked with 8-inch, 12-inch and 14-inch grapevine wreath forms. These are great because they are sturdy, can stand up to the elements and you can poke stuff in them. Remember, just because your wreath form is 12 inches, this doesn’t limit the size of your wreath. You can extend the diameter with the product you choose to use.

Tonkadale Greenhouse spring wreaths: Grapevine forms

Rough out the layout or your wreath.

Lay the elements around the wreath form to see how everybody works together. Begin to cut and trim your stems to the proper length and remember to use the proper tools. A wire cutter and a bolt cutter are a designer’s best friend. Twist your stems around your fingers or hand to wake them up and give them movement. This adds curvature and dimension to your wreath.

Tonkadale Greenhouse spring wreaths: Elements

Make clumps.

Zip tie together all of your elements, leaving the chunky monkeys until the end. Leaves + twigs + vines + pods = easy insertions. Attach your clumps with zip ties (also known as electrical ties at the hardware store). Insert your chunky chunks with either glue or zip ties. Add a little extra twisty vine to cover up any of your boo boos and you are good to go, as seen in the photo at the top.